Idaho Booths

Laura Peterson, Charles Booth’s wife. She was paralyzed her last years for a long time. She was a great gardner in her early years.

Annie, Herbert and Ethel May, stepdaughters Carolyn Olsen and Bertha Annie Olsen. Kamiah, Idaho, 1914

More treasures courtesy of Bee Redwoman: photos of the Idaho branch of the Booth family.

Charles and Herbert Booth with Friends

Summer at Uncle Bill’s

This photo dates to the middle 1950’s. Kathleen Booth Weaver, Henry Benjamin Booth, and Lola Hammond’s brother Earl. Claudia remembers spending Summer evenings at William Bell Stephens Booth’s place on the Salmon River, eating dinner at the long table, followed by rounds of card playing. She would spend a couple of weeks there every summer. Rick Riggs, son of Janet Booth Riggs would tease his cousin Claudia, and she remembers one time he chased her across a field wielding a dead fish. William, aka Uncle Bill, always had oatmeal for breakfast, and would tell the kids, “Oatmeal’s on the stove.” He washed all the dishes, and would say that if they broke a dish, that was just one less for him to wash.

Ruth and Percy Booth wrote a family history at the end of Charles Booth’s diary. They have this entry regarding William.

“An interesting story concerns his given name of William Bell Stephens. William Bell Stephens was an affluent church member of a church in Philadelphia. After Mr. Stephens’ death, his wife pledged money to start construction of a new Episcopal church in Newport, complete with a bell. The church was named St. Stephen’s. When Uncle Bill was 21, he married Lola Hammond, the daughter of an Ashland attorney. The story about William Bell Stephens was not yet complete. One night when he was home alone, the phone rang. The caller identified himself as Bishop Scadding, of Oregon. He told Bill $1000 had been deposited in his name in the bank as a legacy for the next male child of Reverend Charles to be presented when he reached twenty-one. Bill said he had never met Mrs. Stephens and the money was a shocking surprise but it was very welcome as he had just married and the money was needed. He worked for Portland General Electric company as an office employee.

On his retirement he bought a strip of land along the Salmon River near Otis Junction, only a few miles from the coast. He lived there many years. They then moved to Good Samaritan Village, a retirement home in Corvallis. He died October 10, 1978, at age 90, and his ashes are scattered on the beach of the Salmon River not far from his favorite home. He was a good and patient man, respected and loved by his family and all who knew him. Rest in Peace, Uncle Bill.” Percy Booth

Kienitz Cemetery, Minnesota

Claudia received two pages of photocopies from Bee Redwoman,granddaughter to Herbert Booth, the son of John Booth and Sarah Ann Wilcock (Sarah Ann being John’s first wife). These appear to be registries from a cemetery in Minnesota, probably the Kienitz cemetery in Bradford, in Isanti county where Charles was a school superintendant and Episcopal Priest, before he moved West to Oregon and Newport to do those same jobs.  Two registries on the page indicate that Charles and Arvesta had children who died as infants. Alfred Charles who died in 1876 at 11 months, and George Seabury who died in 1882 at 7 months.

Joseph Booth, son of James and Mary was buried there in 1874, and Mary Fallas Booth was buried in 1882. Her headstone says, “Aged 73 years. Beloved wife of James Booth. ‘We look around and see the evil ways of men and feel more reconciled to your departure then.'”

The next page shows one more infant death for Charles and Arvesta, little Samuel Booth died at the age of 7 months and was buried in 1871. His inscription reads, “And there shall be no night there and they need no candle, neither light of the sun.”

Sarah Ann Booth, the first wife of John is also buried there, with a headstone that reads, “Beloved wife of John Booth. ‘A sweet and blessed country – the home of God’s elect.'” She died relatively young, just three weeks before her 33rd birthday.

Ann Booth

The caption reads “Ann Booth, daughter of James and Mary Booth.”

Ann was born in 1850, and though there’s no record of her coming across on the boat from England, since they sailed in 1857, she must have been a little girl at the time.

Ann repurposed an old mathematics textbook into a scrapbook, inserting newspaper clippings on the death of Queen Victoria’s husband Albert, and the traditional gifts for wedding anniversaries, among other things.

Fire at Charles Booth’s Minneapolis Home, 1884

Thursday May 29, 1884

Rev. Charles Booth’s many friends will be sorry to learn of the destruction of his handsome residence in Cambridge by fire on Friday; the major portion of his extensive library was saved, but many valuable volumes were lost. The Union sympathizes with Mr. Booth in his great misfortune. – This item picked up from the Princeton Union Newspaper

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